Tasty herb beats food poisoning, even MRSA!

You can't mistake its warm, citrusy scent. It's a staple in both Mediterranean and Indian cooking.

And it could be what saves you from your next bout with food poisoning.

Not only that, it could become a major player in fighting antibiotic-resistant infections, including E. coli and MRSA.

Who would expect that those little seeds we call coriander could do so much? But researchers at the University of Beira Interior in Portugal found that a solution containing a mere 1.6 percent coriander oil (or in some cases even less) was enough to slow the growth of 12 different strains of bacteria. In fact, most of the bacterial strains were outright killed by coriander.

Not bad at all for a spice that's sitting in my pantry at this very moment!

Coriander's antibacterial effect comes from its ability to damage the membrane that surrounds the cells of bacteria. In turn, the cell can't "breathe" and dies.

Researchers foresee being able to use coriander oil as a food additive to fight pathogens and prevent bacteria from spoiling food.

They also think it could become the next big alternative to the antibiotics we're overusing (you know, the thing that got us into this mess of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the first place!), replacing many clinical drugs.

I do like thinking about a world in which the first thing for which a doctor reaches when faced with a case of MRSA is a bottle of coriander oil rather than a bottle of patent drugs. Big Pharma might not be happy about it, but that world may need to come more quickly than we think. After all, many infections are no longer treatable by patent drugs--the bacteria have outwitted them at this point--and we must continue to find natural alternatives if we want to save lives.

The researchers for this study see coriander being introduced to a clinical setting in the form of mouth rinses, pills, and lotions as part of the fight against infection. I hope they're right.

Coriander is already known not only for being a tasty addition to any kitchen--it's also been shown to relieve pain, ease cramps, aid digestion, and beat fungal infections. It is one of the 20 most commonly used essential oils, and is readily available at health food stores and natural markets.

 

Related articles of interest:

Important News on the Recent E. Coli Outbreak

E. Coli: How To Protect Yourself

US Meat Contaminated with Deadly Superbug

Is Antibiotic Resistance Crawling Into a Home Near You?

 

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About the author

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Christine O'Brien writes the e-letter Health eTips for Dr. Wright's Nutrition and Healing.

You can sign up for the free eTips at www.wrightnewsletter.com.


Comments

Anonymous's picture
1

Anonymous

Do the leaves called cilantro have the same properties as coriander?

Anonymous's picture
2

Bill Humble

There was an article about research at the U of Washington medical school on E Coli, and how cinnamon, lemon grass, and oregano did a real wipe out on it. Interesting that coriander oil would be used for all sorts and the cinnamon not be mentioned.
Always eat a cinnamon roll as desert, never have a bout of E Coli.

Anonymous's picture
3

thewrightwoman

Does anyone know how many drops of coriander oil you need per day to get rid of MRSA.
Please reply

Anonymous's picture
4

Shirley Gekler

Christine:

Thank you for this very informative article. I am one of those that has problems with anti-biotics and appreciate there are better more natural ways of solving our problems. Your comments, quoted below are really good news.

Researchers foresee being able to use coriander oil as a food additive to fight pathogens and prevent bacteria from spoiling food.

They also think it could become the next big alternative to the antibiotics we're overusing (you know, the thing that got us into this mess of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the first place!), replacing many clinical drugs.

I do like thinking about a world in which the first thing for which a doctor reaches when faced with a case of MRSA is a bottle of coriander oil rather than a bottle of patent drugs. Big Pharma might not be happy about it, but that world may need to come more quickly than we think. After all, many infections are no longer treatable by patent drugs--the bacteria have outwitted them at this point--and we must continue to find natural alternatives if we want to save lives.

I use as many natural products as possible, with much better results than what Big Pharma has to offer. Thanks for the info.

mrsatreatmentlady's picture
5

mrsatreatmentlady

Many essential oils have antibacterial properties. When you think about what oils do in nature, this makes sense. Oils help repel invasive pests, parasites and pathogens from the plants that produce them. This helps to protect the plants from infections and other diseases.

As for the question above about how many drops to use for MRSA, the book Medical Aromatherapy by Kurt Schnaubelt has some great general guidelines for using essential oils medicinally. He considers oregano, tea tree, cinnamon, clove and a few others to be the best options for bacterial infections like MRSA. Since MRSA can be very serious, consider being supervised by your MD, or get an experienced Naturopath, if you plan to use natural remedies like the oils.

MRSA Treatment Michelle

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