Using Coriander to Slash High Blood Sugar and Cholesterol

The herb coriander is often used in Indian and Thai dishes. In fact it’s almost guaranteed to be included in any curry dish you order. It has a delicious taste that’s quite distinct and unique and, it turns out, that it comes with an added bonus. Researchers have determined that coriander could help lower blood glucose and LDL cholesterol levels.

A recent clinical trial set out to investigate the potential hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activity of coriander seed. In the animal study, coriander extract was given to both obese rats with elevated blood glucose and cholesterol levels and normal rats.

The researchers found that the coriander extract suppressed hyperglycemia in the obese rats and helped to lower LDL cholesterol levels. They concluded that coriander seed extract in obese rats normalized blood sugar levels and decreased elevated levels of insulin.

The researchers also noted that coriander seed extract lowered cholesterol and exerted a cardio-protective effect. They finished their conclusions by stating the study validates the traditional use of coriander in the treatment of diabetes.

Try using coriander as an alternative remedy to fend off diabetes and harmful cholesterol. You can try sprinkling the seeds into your favorite dishes to give them an extra kick. Or try tossing the fresh leaves into salads and other hot dishes.

Coriander is naturally low in sodium and saturated fat and is a good source of vitamin C, dietary fiber, iron, and calcium.

The herb has long been used as a natural digestive aid and is said to help relieve gas pains. It is an antiseptic and has actually been used to preserve meat, as it kills off the harmful bacteria that grow as meat ages. It has also traditionally been used as an alternative remedy to combat anxiety and insomnia.

 

Related articles of interest:

Tasty herb beats food poisoning, even MRSA!

Seven Simple Cures for Bad Breath

Stopping to Smell the Roses Really Can Relieve Stress

 

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About the author

author-picture

Dr. Victor Marchione received his Bachelor of Science Degree in 1973 and his Medical Degree from the University of Messina in 1981. He has been licensed and practicing medicine in New York and New Jersey for over 20 years.

Dr. Marchione is a respected leader in the field of smoking cessation and pulmonary medicine. He has been featured on ABC News and World Report, CBS Evening News with Dan Rather and the NBC Today Show and is the editor of the popular The Food Doctor newsletter.

Dr. Marchione has also served as Principal Investigator in at least a dozen clinical research projects relating to serious ailments such as bronchitis, pneumonia, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).


Comments

Anonymous's picture
1

Cordier

This is good news!
I'll add this nutrient to my diabetes 2 treatment to morrow. It's so easy to find it. After a month, I will check my blood levels of glucose and LDL cholesterol, then I will convey the results to you.

Anonymous's picture
2

Anonymous

Just read your enlightened article on holy basil and now about coriander. Spent about 45 minutes or more trying to find the exact ways some of the compounds in holy basil did their supposed magic and wasn't able to find any scientific support to your claims.

Would greatly appreciate when you write these informative articles that you cite at least the most important research or sources so that what is read here can be verified.

Anonymous's picture
3

Cordier

We can find the abstracts of the research about coriander seed glucose and lipids here

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2171...
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2136...
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1900...

Anonymous's picture
4

Lori

Not to sound synical, but it's unfortunate that these studies really don't go anywhere. Medical professionals don't seem to read studies in their journals, and, if someone does wake up and smell the coffee here, pharma will make some synthetic analog and charge outrageous sums of money for it. Using spices, herbs, or whatever in their natural form is the best, but honestly, if someone has a crappy diet overall, adding a spice won't make up for it.

Anonymous's picture
5

Gertrude "Trudy"

I have a crappy diet overall & had "reactive hypoglycemia" Category V Critical & metabolic syndrome, for decades. Not now. Dong quai/Tang Kuei (angelica sinensis) fixed the hi-low swings & blind spells, mind fog, passing out. Bromelain enzyme on empty stomach worked great to straighten out my various wonky systems: increased GI absorption thus got more nutrients, reduced plaque/blood pressure/blood thick, BP went 201/104 to 130/80, blood thick 2.8 to 1.0, dissolved coronary blockage & ischemia clots in 6 weeks, no more PAD, RLS, hi-BP, ischemia. Fixed all in 2 months, ok 5 years later. Sugar--no more 200 to 30 hi-lows--I moved & new Drs don't believe I ever had sugar problems. (Bromelain is an enzyme in raw pineapple or papaya, very safe.) I quit sweetNlow saccharine--saccharine kills beta cells! Dong quai on hand but haven't needed it. Blood sugar still ok despite donuts, ice cream, cookies, candy. Feel better at 65 than I did at 35. Crappy diet and all--LOL!

Anonymous's picture
6

Gertrude "Trudy"

KUDOS DUE TO YOU, Healthier Talk: I bookmark nearly every email article you email to me, and often mark your onsite ones too. That's more than all the rest of the zines combined can say. Your various authors are concise, complete, enough in depth for support of assertions, and with citations, but no mind-drowning minutiae. Plus often there are links to learn more. Would you consider e-publishing for-pay collections of your articles by category &/or author?

Alice Wessendorf's picture
7

Alice Wessendorf

Hi Gertrude "Trudy,"

Thanks so much for your comment. It means the world to us to hear such positive feedback.

Your idea for pay collections is a great one and certainly something we will keep in mind for the future.

Thanks again for taking the time to comment! :-)

Anonymous's picture
8

Karola

How much Bromlain do you take? I have some meds that have it in them. I guess not enough. I hope you will respond need help big problem with my sugar sick of increasing my metformine
Have dear friend with the same name. I call her Trudy

Anonymous's picture
9

Shirley Gekler

Dr. V. Marchione:

I found this article very informative and interesting that coriander could have so many health benefits. The fact that it can normalize blood sugar levels and decrease the elevated levels of insulin is amazing.

The fact that coriander is low in sodium and saturated fat, good source of Vit. C, dietary fiber, iron and calcium, it only makes sense to find ways to incorporate coriander into our menu. In addition, it also is a natural digestive aid, antiseptic and a natural alternative for anxiety and insomnia.

We normally hear about the blood sugar levels, while the insulin levels go unchecked, as if they didn't matter, where just the opposite is true the insulin levels are very important and should not be elevated.

According to an article I read recently, it was pointed out that the author considered correct blood sugar levels to be the most important factor for our individual health and that in fact elevated blood sugar levels were a factor in most of the health issues which are currently being treated in North America.

We must realize that high blood sugar is mostly caused by our bad food choices and lack of exercise. We can change those factors. I have also read that inflamation and stress can also have an effect on our blood sugar readings.

Some of the things I personally have done include:
1) reduce coffee to one or two cups per day
2) eliminate sodas
3) reduce white flour products (bread, pasta, etc.)
4) add more aklaine foods (fruits and vegetables)
5) reduce sugar consumption (especially HFCS)
6) I also use a supplement for controlling insulin daily

Thank you for sharing with all of us.

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